Australia Unlimited

Check out Australia Unlimited – they’ve featured us in an article about Paddy the rocket man. Although moving to Adelaide, tinkering with the lab and visiting Disrupt Space in Germany have kept us busy, science stops for no one! Watch this space for more updates yet to launch.   Share This:

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Fuel of the Week: Aluminium

The Neumann Drive has several advantages over legacy solar-electric drive technologies. Because it uses solid fuel, it saves on the tankage, pumps, pipes and all the other things you need for dealing with compressed xenon in a space environment – it is perfectly possible to just leave the metal fuel rods in a vacuum. Because […]

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Fuel of the Week: Tin

In science, learning from your failures can be more important than success. Tin is a really bad fuel for Neumann Drives, but the way it behaves tells us a lot of useful things. Before anything else, tin is a soft metal with a low melting point – it will melt at 233 degrees Celcius, which […]

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Fuel of the week: Bismuth

Bismuth was a material we had high hopes for. It has been used as propellant in other electric spacedrives, notably in the work done by Massey on Bismuth-fuelled Hall Effect Thrusters at Michigan Technological University. There are reasons to think Bismuth would have been a good fuel for the Neumann Drive – it’s a heavy […]

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Fuel of the week: Molybdenum

Molybdenum is your go-faster fuel. It is a heavy refractory metal, with a high melting point. It has been identified in the solar system, but it’s likely to be a parts-per-million component of nickel-iron asteroids. You’ll need to bring it from Earth, but this is the fuel that gets people to Mars. In a Neumann […]

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Fuel of the week: Magnesium

Magnesium is an interesting fuel for several reasons. The first one is that it is a metal that, because of it’s combination of light weight, high strength and ability to be easily formed, is extensively used in aerospace applications. The second is that it has been identified in various places in the solar system, usually […]

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Fuel of the week: Titanium

Titanium is an interesting fuel for a couple of reasons. Firstly, it’s a pretty popular aerospace metal, so there is a fair bit of it floating up in Earth orbit ready for recycling. Secondly, as far as the base Neumann Drive goes, it is a well-behaved light refractory metal that does what it should. Thirdly, […]

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Fuel of the Week: Carbon

As most of you know by now, the Neumann Drive was primarily invented by an Australian physics PhD student, Patrick Neumann. The question therefore came up on the interwebs, with particular props to fatblonde and WittyOriginalName of Reddit, as to whether it can run on Vegemite and/or beer. One of the great things about the […]

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Fuel of the week: Vanadium

The Neumann Drive uses solid fuel and electricity to produce thrust. Over the next few weeks, we’ll give you a taste of how different kinds of solid fuel fared in our lab tests. The thing we’re trying our hardest to optimise is specific impulse which is measured in seconds. We measure how much specific impulse […]

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